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Shareday Friday – A strategy for self-improvement

How do you measure teaching? Trying to pigeon-hole a lesson into one of four categories after just twenty or thirty minutes of observation must be a challenging task. Giving pupils the tools they need to assess where they are in their learning and what the next steps might be is accepted as good practice. Today, for the second of my Shareday Friday gifts, I am providing the same resource for teachers.

There are a number of documents floating around that help in defining what each teaching grade looks like in the classroom. The document below is slightly older than some (as indicated by the ‘Satisfactory’ rating) but I think incredibly useful in self-assessing where one’s own teaching lies.

Ofsted key indicators

When somebody walks into a room to judge the quality of teaching first impressions really do count. Therefore the observer is looking for ‘flags’ that indicate a particular grade of teaching. The question is how do you ensure those flags are in place and clearly visible? When you look at the ‘Key Indicators’ link above what you notice is that the statements for ‘Satisfactory’ (or ‘Requires Improvement’ as it is now) actually appear to describe the practice that most teachers know to include. What marks out the difference then between that ‘Satisfactory’ rating and the two higher grades of teaching. Looking across the page the difference is about embedded practice. Any teacher can ‘switch on’ the requirements for the satisfactory grade but to achieve higher requires embedded good practice.

How to use the ‘Key Indicators’ document for self-improvement
Take a look at the statements, particularly those on the second page about learner and teacher habits. Identify three areas where, given a month in class, you could bring about an improvement that places you in the top grade. What student behaviours or training are needed to achieve that embedded practice? What do you need to be doing and how often to achieve that learner or teacher habit? Make a conscious effort to include those actions in your planning and to evaluate their effectiveness. The single biggest motivator for teacher improvement is when we can see the difference our actions are having on our students.

We can’t be outstanding unless we know what outstanding looks like. Hopefully this Shareday Friday resource helps with gaining an understanding of what outstanding teaching looks like in the classroom.

Note: This document is replicated in a number of areas without copyright and therefore I assume it to be in the public domain and have published it as such.

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