Archive

Archive for the ‘primary education’ Category

Shareday Friday – A strategy for self-improvement

January 30, 2015 Leave a comment

How do you measure teaching? Trying to pigeon-hole a lesson into one of four categories after just twenty or thirty minutes of observation must be a challenging task. Giving pupils the tools they need to assess where they are in their learning and what the next steps might be is accepted as good practice. Today, for the second of my Shareday Friday gifts, I am providing the same resource for teachers.

There are a number of documents floating around that help in defining what each teaching grade looks like in the classroom. The document below is slightly older than some (as indicated by the ‘Satisfactory’ rating) but I think incredibly useful in self-assessing where one’s own teaching lies.

Ofsted key indicators

When somebody walks into a room to judge the quality of teaching first impressions really do count. Therefore the observer is looking for ‘flags’ that indicate a particular grade of teaching. The question is how do you ensure those flags are in place and clearly visible? When you look at the ‘Key Indicators’ link above what you notice is that the statements for ‘Satisfactory’ (or ‘Requires Improvement’ as it is now) actually appear to describe the practice that most teachers know to include. What marks out the difference then between that ‘Satisfactory’ rating and the two higher grades of teaching. Looking across the page the difference is about embedded practice. Any teacher can ‘switch on’ the requirements for the satisfactory grade but to achieve higher requires embedded good practice.

How to use the ‘Key Indicators’ document for self-improvement
Take a look at the statements, particularly those on the second page about learner and teacher habits. Identify three areas where, given a month in class, you could bring about an improvement that places you in the top grade. What student behaviours or training are needed to achieve that embedded practice? What do you need to be doing and how often to achieve that learner or teacher habit? Make a conscious effort to include those actions in your planning and to evaluate their effectiveness. The single biggest motivator for teacher improvement is when we can see the difference our actions are having on our students.

We can’t be outstanding unless we know what outstanding looks like. Hopefully this Shareday Friday resource helps with gaining an understanding of what outstanding teaching looks like in the classroom.

Note: This document is replicated in a number of areas without copyright and therefore I assume it to be in the public domain and have published it as such.

Advertisements

Your interview with an International school

January 28, 2015 Leave a comment

After seven years of recruiting for British schools in Spain I have put together 5 tips for teachers approaching an interview with an international school.

1: Maintain the focus on education
It is easy to get drawn into generalisations about your future host country. Try to avoid these as they hide you as a teacher. When asked why you want to go to a specific country a glib “love the food and love the culture” doesn’t separate you from the crowd. Try to prepare answers that show you are thinking about developing yourself professionally or personally. Use the questions that are asked as vehicles to communicate your teaching philosophy and wherever possible put in relevant examples of your work. A portfolio that provides examples of your planning, professional development and classroom practice can be a useful tool to refer to when answering questions and can help to keep your responses tightly focused on education.

2: Provide positive reasons for your relocation
Many people looking to work in an international school may well do so because they are feeling disenchanted with some aspects of their current career choices. During your interview focus on the reasons you are attracted to the school or country you are considering to make your new home. If you overly focus on aspects of the education system that you dislike you risk sounding like a ‘moaner’. Nobody wants negativity in the staff room so whilst sharing some opinions helps to present you in an open way, stay positive.

3: Research
Find out what you can about the school and the area. If you have been sent a welcome pack then do read it and don’t waste interview time asking questions that have already been covered. Check out the school website. Come to the interview ready to show you have done this homework. It creates a great impression if you can respond positively to an event already covered on the school website. (“It looks as though everybody in the school had a great time when they celebrated …”) It helps to know a little about the area too. Have a look on Google maps. Start thinking about where teachers may live and be asking questions about the area from the standpoint of having already done a little homework. You may find in moving to an International school that you are moving into a curriculum that is unfamiliar to you. Again, whilst it shows a professional attitude to ask what support may be on offer to help you adapt to the curriculum, it is important to have done your research so you are able to answer curriculum questions on interview.

4: Be open and be interesting
Most international schools, especially if this is your first relocation or your first time in the host country, will be looking at you personally and considering whether you have the character needed to be happy and to make your move successful. Be prepared to discuss your hobbies and even to have some idea of how you may be able to continue those hobbies when you move. It may feel at times as though the interview is prying slightly more into your personal life than if you were interviewing for a school in your home country.

5: Approach the interview as a two way process
Most international schools will send out a detailed welcome pack in advance of the interview. Many will also give a presentation about their school and the area in which they work as a part of the interview. The interview is a two way process and you should approach the interview with a confidence and determination to get straight answers to any of your own questions. This may be the only time you have before relocating to find out what the school offers. Be clear with your questions and make sure that all details about your contract and the support offered by the school are clear before you leave the interview. It is a two way process and you are picking the school and team of people that you would like to work with as much as them choosing you. Remember, wherever you eventually choose to work will have your professional commitment so you need to be comfortable that you have all the information you need to make an informed decision.

Common English errors made by Spanish speakers

January 27, 2015 2 comments

An explanation of the most common errors made by native Spanish students and how they can be corrected by the teacher.

Native Spanish speakers face a number of challenges in learning English. The translation from Spanish into English leads to common errors. If the teacher understands exactly what the error is and why it is being made then correcting the error is made easier.

Here are seven of the most common errors together with an explanation as to why the error is made. If you find this interesting and would like me to cover more of these common errors please do leave a comment below.

1: Pronunciation; “eschool, espaghettis”.
In Spanish words that begin with ‘s’ followed by a consonant start with the letter ‘e’. Students need practice in saying and writing these words correctly.

2: Common requests; “I can go to the toilet?” or “You are poorly?”
In English the habit of ‘upspeak’ is generally considered poor practice. It refers to raising the tone of the voice at the end of a statement in order to turn the statement into a question. In Spanish questions are normally formed without the use of an auxiliary verb and there is no need to invert the verb/subject order. Students need to learn that in English questions should not begin with the subject. Younger students should be able to learn this through modelling and oral repetition but older students will benefit from understanding why they are making the mistake.

3: Order of noun and adjective; “the car red”. Plural adjectives “the fats cats”.
In Spanish the order of the noun and adjective is usually opposite to English and students need to know to change the order of the noun and adjective.
In Spanish adjectives agree in gender and number with the word that they describe. Consequently students often pluralise adjectives in English. They need to be explicitly taught that adjectives in English are not plural.

4: Questions – In English questions are normally made using an auxiliary verb.
Forming questions correctly is a difficult area for Spanish learners. Students need to learn how to form questions using auxiliary verbs such as “can”, “have” and “do”.

5: Short answers to questions; “me no!”.
In English the short answer to a “yes/no” question is made by repeating the auxiliary verb with which the question has been made.
E.g. “Can you swim?” is answered with “Yes, I can.” Or, “Do you like pizza?” would be answered with “No, I don’t”.

6: Ellipsis of subject pronoun; “(Carlos) is a fast runner”.
In Spanish it is common to leave out the subject pronoun as the verb ending often contains this information. Students need to be taught to say and write the subject with the verb. In speech and in writing Spanish students often add the verb “is” when it is not needed. E.g. “Carlos is like the pizza”. This normally happens with the third person singular and is less common with other pronouns. For example, it would be more unusual to hear the error as “You is like the pizza”. This may well result from students confusing the conjugation of the third person singular verb “he likes, she eats” with the “s” sound in “is”. Students benefit from focusing on the conjugation of regular verbs in the present tense and understanding that it is only the third person singular that carries the final “s” sound.

7: Countable and uncountable nouns/there is, there are; “the people is happy” or “there is pens on the table”.
In Spanish some nouns are uncountable whereas in English those same nouns are countable. In Spanish the impersonal verb “haber” is used to express “there is” and “there are”. The same word (hay) is used for singular and plural objects which further compounds this problem.

Relocating to Spain with family

January 26, 2015 Leave a comment

So, you’re a teacher and are considering relocating to Spain to work but you have family. What about your partner and child/children?

As with all these posts I can only speak from experience of the schools I work with but hopefully this information will at least help in asking the right questions and making sure that any job offer you receive is right for your whole family.

It is often said that when you are moving to another country with a partner that there are two necessities for the move to be a success. Firstly, you should both make an effort to learn the language. Secondly you both need work. I can imagine that without something to occupy each day and the social interactions of work that life in a foreign country could become quite an isolating experience. One of the offers we make to families moving to work in our schools is to endeavor to offer a position to both parties. If both are trained teachers that is always a bonus but where the other person is in another line of work, if they are interested we offer a position within school. It may be that of classroom assistant, support class assistant or even librarian. That offer of work always helps the process of adapting to the new situation and also alleviates financial pressure. Assistant staff in school are paid on a salary of approximately 16,000€ so the extra wage certainly helps.

Children are offered a tuition free place in the school. Although not completely free, as there are still uniform and dining room expenses, this is a substantial help to most families with children. It means that children can continue in the British education system. Children of secondary age would go on to study iGCSE and A Levels as they would in the United Kingdom. Children of primary age or younger are working to the same curriculum that they would experience in the United Kingdom.

In terms of language support children below the age of five are usually quick to develop language, learning from their peers. It is unlikely that a child joining the school at five or younger would need any additional support. Children over the age of five are usually given individual support classes to help them learning Spanish. The successful social adaptation of children depends on a fluency with the language. My own daughter was six years old when we moved to Spain and after around 18 months had sufficient fluency and confidence to socialise in the same way as she would with children speaking her native language. We also offer language lessons to all our staff as learning the language certainly helps with integration.

If you are considering a move to work internationally and have a partner interested in finding work it is worth considering how to present as an asset to the school. Undertaking a TEFL qualification or even just volunteering in a school or youth setting may be of interest to a potential employer. Beginning to learn the language before you leave the UK, or showing a commitment to doing so, is also a move that sends a future employer a strong message about your determination to adapt and make your move work. Any evidence of preparing the family as a unit for the move is important to share. As an employer we always feel a duty of care to a family joining us and evidence of the family preparing as a unit for their planned move is always reassuring.

I hope this helps anybody considering moving to Spain, or elsewhere internationally, with their family. If anybody has any questions regarding moving a family please do post them in the comments section and I will answer as best I can from my own experience.

Work life balance – A Spanish working Sunday

January 25, 2015 Leave a comment

ThermometerI think Spanish Sundays are probably one of the biggest differences between teaching in the UK and in Spain. I’m writing this article sat on my terrace with the sun on my face and a view of the mountains in the distance. I do have some work to do. I have an assembly on the theme of ‘Tolerance’ to prepare in two different ways, firstly for Key Stage 1 and then for Key Stage 2. For the resources relating to this assembly read my first ‘Shareday Friday’ post. My giving back to the community started with a series of resources for PSHE – Virtues.

I also have a staff meeting to prepare on the topic of display. With a colleague preparing a discussion about what consitutes effective display my role is to plan the discussion leading to an agreed display policy. There is a wealth of excellent material on the Internet, not least the inspirational primary displays website.

But the weather is too good to waste so before I get ready for the week ahead I’m off to walk my dog on Cullera beach. Happy Sunday everybody and I hope the work-life balance feels good.

UPDATE:

Picture of Cullera Beach

Trying not to take for granted where I live. The Costa del Azahar (orange blossom coast) sits on the northern edge of Costa Blanca. A couple of hours of Sunday afternoon spent walking along the edge of the Mediterranean really helps that feeling of a work-life balance.

Shareday Friday – A whole school approach to PSHE

January 23, 2015 2 comments

I’ve decided that Friday will be my day for sharing. It may be an idea, a resource, a display or something completely unpreditcable but each Friday I will share something from school to this blog.

I’m starting today with a whole school approach relevant to PSHE, citizenship, or even just giving a structure to assemblies.

Called ‘Virtues’ this is a series of human virtues that we would like to develop in our children. Our method for using this is to use it as a basis for assembly and the class circle time. A new ‘Virtue’ is introduced in assembly and exists as the theme in school for two weeks. In the assembly introduction I will usually tell a story to highlight the theme or provide some visual reference to the theme. Teachers in class then display the poster on a large piece of card and pupils try to find that virtue happening in their classroom. When they see it taking place they point it out to their teacher and the person exhibiting the virtue writes onto the class poster what they did to demonstrate the virtue in action. These posters are then brought to the following week’s assembly so we can review the great attitudes evident in our school. With no religious or denominational tie, but the facility to easily make such a link, these ‘Virtues’ provide a resource that is applicable in any primary school setting. They may even provide a response to the call for British values to be taught in schools although I would argue that these virtues are more universal.

The posters are reproduced below and please feel free to use them as you wish. Happy Shareday Friday and have a great weekend.

Assertiveness

Cleanliness

Co-operation

Courage

Courtesy

Diligence

Friendliness

Gentleness

Honesty

Listening

Obedience

Peacefulness

Perseverence

Respect

Responsibility

Self-Discipline

Tolerance

Trust

VIRTUES

Note: This series of posters was provided to me by a colleague and I have no reason to think they are not in the public domain.

Teaching in a British School in Spain – FAQ

January 21, 2015 3 comments

After years of recruiting people to work with us in Spain I have put together a list of the frequently asked questions. These are taken from questions that I frequently hear from interview candidates. Hopefully this helps teachers who are maybe considering a move to working in Spain but if you have any other questions do post them in ‘comments’ and I will answer them as best I can. These are based on my personal experience in my own school so answers may differ for other schools.

What contract do teachers have?
All teachers are placed on a full time permanent contract from day one of their employment. We do this in recognition of the commitment teachers have made in relocating to work with us but also because life in Spain is made easier with a permanent contract. Obtaining credit, buying a car and even opening a bank account are made easier with a permanent contract. Teachers are salaried over twelve months which include holiday pay throughout the year up to and including the August holiday.

I don’t speak Spanish. Will this be a problem?
Our English staff do not need to speak Spanish in school. In fact, our policy is for our English staff to only ever speak with our pupils in English. Clearly in your own private life a working knowledge of Spanish is helpful if you are living in Spain. For this reason the school provides free Spanish lessons to all staff each year.

What does the working day look like?
The working day runs from 9am-5pm. Children begin to arrive in school from 9.15am with classes starting at 9.30am. Lessons are fifty minutes long and we have six lessons per day. Children have a 30 minute morning break and a 20 minute afternoon break. Lunchtime is one and a half hours with teachers doing a thirty minute duty during lunchtime.

What planning and preparation time is given to teachers?
Teachers receive a generous amount of planning and preparation time during the school day. Primary staff currently receive just over five hours of planning and preparation time. In addition having completed their duty teachers have a full hour for lunch which again contributes to our staff completing all of their work during the school day.

What professional development opportunities are available?
As a member of the National Association of British Schools in Spain (NABSS) we have access to a range of professional development opportunities throughout the year. Our teachers have attended training courses in Valencia, Madrid, Seville, Alicante and Tenerife. All of these courses have been run by experts brought out from the United Kingdom. This enables our staff to stay up to date with curriculum and policy changes taking place in the United Kingdom and ensure that their own teaching continues to develop. We also run ‘in-house’ training. This has included a full day of training for all staff where we employed trainers from the United Kingdom as well as opportunities to look at more specific issues during shorter training sessions.

Do staff eat with children?
Staff can choose to eat in the dining room with children although most staff choose to eat with colleagues in one of the two desginated staff dining areas. Staff are entitled to eat for free from our canteen. Meals are prepared daily from fresh seasonal ingredients. There is a focus on Mediterranean cuisine so plenty of fresh fish, shell fish and meats are accompanied by seasonal fruits and vegetables. Most days a salad is also on offer. The school caters for a range of specific diets.

What happens with extra-curricular activities?
Most of our pupils travel to and from school on our school transport therefore extra-curricular activities take place during the lunchtime. We have a programme of activities led by professional staff from outside school. Activities include ballet, funky dance, Chinese, German, Italian, football, tennis, judo and fencing. Alongside these activities teachers from our primary team provide complementary activities that enrich the curriculum. Teachers leading an extra-curricular activity do so in place of their usual lunchtime duty.

How does Spanish social security work?
On arriving in Spain the school employs a solicitor to process paperwork for new teachers. This includes registering new staff with the Spanish social security system. This provides full cover for health, unemployment and pensions. All of the necessary paperwork is paid for and completed by the school on your behalf.

What about healthcare?
The Spanish public health system is recognised to be of an exceptionally high standard. Treatments are provided with minimal waiting times. In addition the school provides a private health care for employees covering their time in school and their journey to and from school.

Are there any other staff benefits at the school?
We have an established staff benefits package that provides advantages with a number of local business. We have financial benefits arranged with a number of banks including Barclays Bank, BBVA, and Catalunya Caixa. These provide cash back on purchases, guaranteed overdraft arrangements and preferential rates on mortgages, account transfers and credit cards or loans.
We also have arrangements in place for discounts with regard to private health care including preferential monthly rates with Adeslas, Avisa, BBVA and MAPFRE. A local dentistry practice offers our staff 15% off all treatments.
Our staff benefits package is growing all the time and teachers are provided with the full details of this package when they start working at the school.

What is the salary and are there opportunities to supplement my salary?
The salary for teachers is 22,500€ per year. Tax rates in Spain are significantly lower than the United Kingdom with most teachers paying around 14% which includes tax and National Insurance contributions. The school has a number of positions of responsibility with the primary department currently offering six members of staff a responsibility allowance in addition to their salary.
Some parents may request additional classes for children in the hour after school and these are always offered initially to our teaching staff. These classes are worth upto 48€ per hour.
Although not obligatory teachers are welcome to work in the Saturday school which the school runs from 10am-1pm on a Saturday morning. This provides English lessons to children from the local area who do not attend the school. Teachers choosing to do this receive a separate payment in addition to their usual salary.

%d bloggers like this: