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February 15, 2015 Leave a comment

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose

January 18, 2015 1 comment

It’s the time of year when International schools begin their advertising for positions starting in September. But, if you are considering a move to teaching in Spain how do you know which school to choose?

Teaching in Spain offers three options. The first option and the one I will focus on in this article is teaching in a British school in Spain. British schools will teach the British National Curriculum. The other two options are to work as an English teacher in a Spanish school or to teach in an academy. The Spanish education system is quite protective of Spanish teachers and entering a Spanish state school would require a high level language exam in Spanish and then the Spanish exam of teacher knowledge. (Convalidating English teaching degrees in order that they can be recognised by a Spanish state school is notoriously challenging and expensive.)  An academy in Spain is not the same as in England. “Academy” refers to language schools. Often these will operate outside of the normal school day and will offer language lessons in a TEfL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) style approach. Although a living can be made from an academy a regular monthly income can often not be guaranteed. Hours will be as customer demands and there is likely to be significant fluctuation in monthly take home pay.

So, what about teaching in a British School in Spain? The first requirement of any reputable British School will be that candidates for teaching positions are qualified teachers. Most will also ask that the qualification is from the United Kingdom or recognised in the United Kingdom. Applicants from outside of the European Union are often welcomed but obtaining the necessary work permits can take longer.

Within Spain the private school industry is relatively unregulated compared to the United Kingdom. Consequently there are ‘good’ and ‘bad’ employers to be found. Most UK teachers with experience of working overseas will tell you that accreditation from the British Council is the most important recognition. In Spain there are only a very few schools directly licensed by the British Council. However, there is an established network within Spain that provides a considerable benefit to UK teachers looking to work in a British School. The organisation ‘National Association of British Schools in Spain’ (NABBS) has a recognition within the UK and provides a set of standards and employee rights that gives a level of protection and ensures that the school is of an appropriate standard. These schools also undergo an inspection that is approved by the British Council and responsable for ensuring a high quality of British education.

You can cross-reference advertisements on TES Online with the NABBS website. Once you have confirmed that the school has British Council or NABBS membership you can be reasonably assured that you have identified an appropriate potential employer.

Most Spanish independent schools are privately owned and most of those are privately owned by a Spanish family or a Spanish company. In essence, like many UK private schools, they are businesses. The most significant difference for many teachers moving to teach in Spain is not actually the change of country but the change from being in state education to being in private education. I would advise that happier adaptations to this change are found if the school itself has a duty of care for the education provided. This can be found out in a number of ways. Firstly, looking at the advertisement that the school has placed. I would be wary of any school not taking advantage of a profesional advertisement on TES Online. Failing to provide a school insignia, photographs or a link to the school website all indicate a business keen to save every possible penny. If the webite is available take a look. Does it appear to be just a shop window, an online advert, or does it reflect the values and mission statement of the school? Does the school provide a welcome pack as a part of their advertisement? Does the welcome pack include information about support given to employees?

Having applied to the school, reputable schools will consider an interview a two way process and will welcome your questions. If the advertisement is for a short notice position then a Skype or telephone interview may be offered. However, if the position has been advertised with sufficient time then a face to face interview is a more profesional approach. A school advertising a September post in March or April that is unwilling to finance a face to face interview in the UK I would suggest is sending out a negative message about the value they place on their teaching staff.

As a final thought, what should you expecct from an interview? British schools in Spain, especially if they have visited London or another UK city to offer face to face interview, have made a substantial financial commitment to obtaining their teaching staff. They will be interested not only in your profesional role as a teacher but also in your personal profile as somebody preparing to make an international move. Anything you can do to indicate preparation for your move will strengthen your interview. Have you begun to learn the language? Have you considered aspects of adaptation to living away from family and friends? The interview is also a two way process. There should be a chance for you to ask what support the school offers new teachers. Relocation packages in terms of direct financial gifts are not common for Spain but support in terms of finding accomodation and arranging necessary paperwork including becoming a part of the Spanish health system should be provided.

If you approach a move carefully and consider the school and the support offered then living and teaching in Spain can be a wonderful move. With sunshine, almost universally supportive parents andvery few behaviour problems it is easier to focus on the teaching and remember why you chose this profession.

If you want further information please do post questions in the comments section below and I will reply.

Endings and beginnings

June 22, 2013 Leave a comment

In the last few weeks I have had opportunities to reflect on endings and beginnings. One week before the end of the school term we moved house. In amongst all the activities of a school term ending it has made for a busy few weeks.
The house moving preparations began about a month before we actually moved house. There were two clear strategies in place. I was applying a pure energy to moving everything from one house to the other. With two weeks overlap where we had keys to the new property and were invited to move what we wanted prior to the official moving day, time around my working hours was filled with physically moving as much as possible to facilitate the final move. This was my strategy. It involved getting up at five thirty most mornings and taking a car load of hastily filled boxes from the old house to the new house. I succeeded in moving at least two car loads each day, one before work and one after work. My wife meanwhile was applying her own strategy to the moving preparations. It began in her own wardrobe with each item of clothing being reviewed, tried on if necessary and then a decision made as to whether it was to be packed, or put into a black bin bag and thrown away.
Both strategies for a new beginning in a new house are valid but arguably the strategy employed by my wife is more deserved of the ‘new beginning’ title.
And so we come to the end of the term. The last task for me was to deliver the whole school assembly to our primary pupils. The school has just received the data relating to the pupils completing their final year and again is sitting considerably above the best of the rest in the region. I started the assembly by inviting three final year A’ Level students to explain their own aspirations and then provided the link between hard work and the options that are available to us in our lives.
The assembly went well with input from our Year 6 pupils moving to secondary and time to say goodbye to the departing deputy head. As is customary we talked about ‘moving on’ and ‘new beginnings’.
Next week we have two non-pupil days to wrap up the term. In talking about ‘new beginnings’ in respect to a new school year I think we have the same two strategies available to us as we did when I moved house a week ago. We could blindly pack up all we have been working on this year and unwrap it all to start afresh in September. However, as with moving house, I’m not certain that would give us the energy that comes with a ‘new beginning’.
The other option is that favoured by my wife when moving house. To review each item before carrying over. I think my house move has taught me that the second option is more refreshing in creating that ‘new beginning’ and therefore at the start of next week I am going to invite an open feedback on what should be in the boxes that we pack for September. Which of our whole school strategies and systems have been effective and which do we need to review or discard before we move into the new academic year. With the School Development Plan reviewed in January this should provide an opportunity to check that we are moving in the right direction and that our plans are having the intended impact on teaching and learning. Hopefully, September will bring a new academic year that provides a genuine fresh start. Strategies that are effective in enhancing teaching and learning will be strengthened and those that are not having the desired impact will be left behind in the move.

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